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Rose’s TPLO Recovery Week 4

We’re at the beginning of week four.  This has been the week that marks Rose’s breaking point.  She is so done with inactivity.  We’ve bought chew toys, chew bones, real bones, distraction toys… you name it.  Her attention span is almost nil.  She has decided to take her frustration out on the carpet she is on, chewing the corner nicely.  We take Rose everywhere we go, so as to give her new things to look at, people to see, and so that we can monitor her activities.  She has been increased to one 10 minute slow walk each day, which she loves.  She continues to put more weight on the affected leg.   This was taken on  a trip to set up 6000 Easter eggs stuffed with candy for local children.

Happy Easter, everyone!

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Rose’s TPLO Recovery Week 2

As we begin the second week (of six where she is not permitted to walk except to potty) we do all we can to keep her entertained.  She managed to chew her inflatable collar and puncture it., but we believe her wound is healed enough now to tolerate the small amount of licking she does.  She is beginning to grow coat on her leg, and the growing fur must itch.  When we take her out to potty, she puts some weight on her foot, but not so much as to worry us.  The veterinarian stated that it was fine to put weight on the foot as she will tolerate it, but she is still on restriction.  She is not permitted to go on a walk or play with other dogs.  She is still on “bedrest”.

We take her on car rides with us, so that her scenery changes, and so that she always has company with her.  She enjoys her rides, and is usually exhausted once we come home:

Today (4/3/17) we had a nice sunny day (the snow has just melted), so I took her outside to just sit in the sun and suck up a bit of warm sunshine.  She enjoyed it a great deal.

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Rose’s TPLO Recovery Day 7

Rose’s sutures are evidently starting to itch, and she is licking her knee.  That has earned her the “cone of shame” for awhile, to keep her off of the sutures, until she’s at the 10-14 day mark, when the wound is likely healed.

She continues to be obviously bored, and at times rocks back and forth on her back.  We know she’s tired of being in the same place, not allowed to walk about or play.   This is very hard for a 8 month old puppy.  It’s not natural for them to stay put for weeks on end.  Yet, she is on strict orders by her surgeon to have strict “crate rest”, and not be allowed to go out for any reason other than to go potty, and that must be on leash.  We’re trying to find ways to resolve her boredom.  I bring her up on the couch with me to snuggle, but she tires easily of that too.  Nothing holds her attention for very long.

Boredom:

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Rose’s TPLO Recovery Day 4

Monday 3/27/17 – Tues. 3/28/17

We are Icing Rose’s knee a few times each day, as she has quite a bit of swelling distal to the knee.  It’s hard to elevate the leg of a young dog.  Pillows make for good eating!  So, we are just making sure to keep it cool to reduce swelling.

Rose seems to be in less pain, and because she has not had a B.M. since her surgery, we’re giving her pain medication less often.  She’s still on a anti-inflammatory, so that helps with pain, but narcotic medications increases constipation, and we don’t want that!   Pain is a natural part of healing, and as long as she is not distressed (crying or agitated), pain keeps her off that leg and quiet.

But, Rose is starting to show signs of boredom.  Since she was on crate rest for almost three weeks before her surgery, it makes sense that this poor 7 month old is going out of her mind with boredom.  If she is not in her crate, she has to be tethered, to prevent jumping or walking around on that knee.  But she’s starting to look a bit pitiful.

Yesterday we decided to buy her some interactive toys, and take her with us in the truck.  When the back seat lays down, it provides a perfect flat surface for her to travel on, and maybe seeing something other than our den will help liven her up:

Rose, want to go for a ride?

She looked at everything along the ride!

 

She came home exhausted, and slept for hours.  Oh, and when we came home, and she had her first B.M. since surgery.  Yay!

We bought a few interactive toys for her, and they should help entertain her a bit more.   She’s enjoying them today.(Tues 3/28/17)

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Memory Lane

Just when I think I have finished the website revamp, I change something.  I had settled on a template I liked, then, at the last moment, I found the one I settled on, and am very happy with it.  I hope you’ll give me feedback to assist me in knowing what works best for the general public.

In the rebuilding of this website, I took a trip through memory lane.  I revisited Cher, our first Labrador, who was an awful example of the breed, but taught me so much.  Most important, it was due to her, that I met Winnie Limbourne (Wingmaster), Donna Smith (Donally) and Barbara Davis (Boldcrest).  …and the greatest of them all, Champion Bold Aaron CD WC!  Aaron changed my life.  Aaron was the greatest of all Labradors (in my newbie mind), and today, with far more education in the breed still stands out as one of the most influential Labradors in Labrador history.   The day Barbara handed me his leash and asked me to hold him is fixed in my mind.  Had she had me grasp the hand of the most famous person in the world, it would not have had more impact on me.  Every dog at Blue Knight goes back to that dog.  So many generations ago, that I don’t know who has had the most influence on my dogs, him, or my increasing knowledge.  Probably both.

Many of my first mentors in Labradors have now passed on.  I miss them terribly.  It’s probably the typical lamenting that all people do as time passes, but they all represent better days gone by – a more innocent time in Labs.  Those were the days when everyone laughed, everyone smiled, everyone cheered, everyone imparted knowledge freely, and they were generous with it.  I don’t recall any of them referencing a dog in the ring in anything but positive ways.  My friend and mentor, Winnie, told me “Never fault judge a Labrador [looking for the negative].   Always find the best features on the dog.  Anyone can fault Judge, it’s cheap and easy.  If you want to be a good judge of the dogs, find the positive, and the one with the most positives is the dog that should take the ribbon.”   I will never forget those words.  Every generation has “the greats” in the breed … people who have had an immeasurable impact on the breed.  Just over a week ago, we lost another of the ‘old’ guard.  I pray there are always those sorts in the breed.  I suppose their will be, but like every aging person, I sense the best are gone.   I pray the influence of each of them can be found on these pages.  I tried.

I revisited in my mind, Sugar – our first Champion.  I never got a puppy from her, and her only daughter (a singleton) was owed to a breeder for finishing her for me.  The sale of that girl to another country nearly killed me, I’d have sold my house to get her back, but the choice was not given to me.  That wound is well healed, and there are no bad feelings, but I guess there is a lingering lament.   Sugar taught me so much, and was such a wonderful girl.  When we lost her to cancer, her Veterinarian cried harder than I did.  So loved was our Sug!

Adam!  Ch. Blue Knight Classic Genesis.  When I think about him, I can still feel the coarse waves in his coat.  He was a silly, sometimes unruly, always sweet and tender with my grandkids.  Always.

Casey, the love bug.  His was the best temperament of any Lab I knew, and he passed it on to his many children.  He was a clone of his father, Ben (Wingmaster’s Just Another Fella), and best friend to our grandson, Aaron.  The relationship between those two was something quite special.

There were dogs we shared our lives with who did nothing in the ring, except shared our lives with us.  I can still sense what running my hands through their coats felt like and remember the sad last moments with them.   I could go through them all here on paper, or just lump them all together as memories of wagging tails, big-muddy feet, lots of shedding, silliness and love.  I do not regret a single moment of my time with them, except that their lives are never long enough, and each takes a piece of me with them, and each that comes into our lives, fills the void left by their predecessor.

I look at these pages, and I can smell newborn puppies.  That’s often how I remember each dog here.  I know them from their first breath.  Many go off to homes, and their families become family.  I just spoke to one today.  His family has had three of our dogs.  His first when he was single, the next to he and his wife, and now, with two children, he has his third Lab.   Another family, was a young Marine and his wife.  I get photos of their children, one who has been to her prom now.  They have had three of our dogs as well.  Another couple has also had three of our dogs.  I hear from them often.   Not long ago, I received a email from a couple who included photos of their still living 15 year old dog and their young children, thanking me for a lifetime of love.  Those emails make my heart jump for joy.  We have sold puppies to famous people, and just normal folks, and each of them bring memories of first kisses and ‘going home’.

Labrador Retrievers have filled the lives of my children, and their children.  Every one of our eight grandchildren have had a Labrador in their lives.    The impact of the Labrador on my family is immense.  Our family memories have, and always will, include Labradors.

I hope that you find, within these pages, a feel for the impact of these dogs on our lives, and that we have imparted some of the knowledge these dogs have given us, but mostly the love they freely give.   If I have missed the mark, and you don’t find those things in these pages, I want to know.

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In Hot Pursuit…

We received a update photo this week on Blue Knight In Hot Pursuit At Alibi (Chase) at 5.5 months. He is owned by Julie Oghigian (Montview Labradors) and Kim Jacobson (Alibi Labradors).  We’re excited to see how this boy performs in the ring.  Best wishes to Julie, Kim, and Chase.

Multi-BISS GCH Laurglen Ardent Rogue at HySpire JH RN CGC
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Blue Knight Perfect Storm  (CH. Pointed)

Chase is a black who carries chocolate.

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No Christmas Puppies Here

On 12/3/01 there was a debate on a dog list I am on. I wrote an editorial of sorts.
I was asked to put it on my site, so here it is…

Without fail, the phone starts to ring off the hook in Late Nov. “We’re looking for a Christmas Puppy”. I have no “Christmas Puppies” ever. The holidays mark one of the worst times of year to send a puppy home. I’ve been chewed out a time or two by people who are unhappy with our rule.

The health and welfare of “MY” puppies (and as long as they are in my home, they are MY puppies) is my greatest concern. Only I will determine where they go and why.

Do I send puppies home for two weeks before to two weeks after Christmas? NO.

Why? It is an unsafe time of year for many reasons.

  • Impulse buying.
  • Household chaos
  • Unusual dangers.

 

Many, not all, buyers during the holidays are impulse buyers. The kids want a puppy, so they start looking. It is seldom a well thought out, well *talked* out decision.

Households are busy during the holidays. WAY too busy. Puppies add to that chaos. It is a bad mix. Puppies in stress = puppies in distress = potentially sick puppies. Families are stressed. A puppy adds to the stress. Another bad mix.

Tinsel, garland, and ribbon are really interesting to a puppy. Tinsel, garland, and ribbon can easily be swallowed and cause a bowel obstruction. Mix that with family chaos on Christmas morning, a puppy eating these items may not be noticed.

Ask breeders who have been at this for any length of time if they know of a puppy chewing Christmas tree wires and burning their mouths badly. Yes, I have. Ask me if I know of a puppy that went home to hang itself in Christmas tree lights? Yes, I do. How much chocolate (poison to a dog) is hanging around on low tables during the holidays. How much See’s candy is under the tree? Lots of it. I don’t want my baby Labrador sick, injured or dead from those accidents waiting to happen. Can they happen at other times of the year? Of course. However, the holidays have more dangerous things all in one place at one time than any other time of the year.

So, what have we done? We give the family a list of “puppy things” to give to the children. “Santa” has called children and explained why their elves had to deliver a puppy old enough to go home a couple of weeks before Christmas (It’s too cold for a little puppy on a sleigh at night). The written instructions to the child in the special letter from “Santa” tells the child that more is to come for the puppy, but during the busy hustle and bustle of the days around Christmas, the puppy is to be kept in the special “puppy room” that Mommy and Daddy have made ahead of time. It’s safer for the puppy. Because the ‘new’ of the puppy will have worn off in two weeks, it is easy to keep the puppy in a more controlled environment, and the puppy has had time to settle in.

“Santa” has called on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, and mysteriously known the name of a puppy that a child wants, and explains to a child that he or she needs to put up a stocking for “Max” the puppy, who will be delivered by a helper after Christmas, because the puppy was too young. Santa promises to bring lots of important things for the puppy, to include a picture, and pedigree. Santa has delivered certificates on Christmas morning with a picture of a pregnant mamma dog, with the promise of the child getting to experience the joy of seeing their newborn puppy grow in the weeks following Christmas.

There are many “work-arounds” that a breeder can do to make a family happy and do the right thing for a puppy. And I can tell you that “Santa” has kept many wonderful letters from children who were so happy with their late Christmas puppy, that came home after the tree came down, after the house settled down, to a home ready with everything a puppy could ever need, and the smiling face and waiting arms of a child who has put down all of the other Christmas toys, and is ready to give all of their attention to their new friend. Some of the parents swear that after that Christmas Eve phone call from Santa, the kid will believe in him until the age of 40 or so.

 

LEGAL STUFF

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