No Such Thing – “Silver” Labradors

There is no such thing as a SILVER Labrador.

[I wrote the article below in about 1990, and updated it from time-to-time.  I’m leaving it here for archive purposes, however, the LRC, Inc. has recently published an article that says it all:  CLICK HERE]

~Dian Welle, Blue Knight Labradors

There are some breeders who would use our wonderful breed make a quick buck at the expense of the breed. That goes especially to those who would try to sell as “rare”, and at top dollar, any mismark or colors other than the three colors accepted in Labradors world-wide. There are no rare colors in Labradors. There are three accepted colors, Black, yellow and Chocolate. The AKC standard defines shades of yellow as Light cream to fox red. Chocolates are defined as being light to dark chocolate.

Regarding “Silver”, this is not an accepted Labrador color. Some of these breeders often sell other “rare” colors, such as “white”. White Labradors are simply “light cream” (as defined in the Standard) yellow Labradors. They are worth no more than their other yellow siblings. Is there anything wrong with breeding the lightest yellow color in Labs? Absolutely not. They can be shown, they are correct. They’re just not “rare”, and they’re not called “white”. There is *no* mention in any accepted standard in the world of Silver, Charcoal (this is a new one!), white, caramel, or any other named color you may be tricked into believing is accepted color in Labradors. If you are interested in a very light yellow, simply tell the breeders you want a *very light yellow*. They’ll understand!
Here is the color standard for Labradors as drafted by the Parent Club (LRC, Inc.) and accepted by the AKC:

Color
The Labrador Retriever coat colors are black, yellow and chocolate. Any other color or a combination of colors is a disqualification. A small white spot on the chest is permissible, but not desirable. White hairs from aging or scarring are not to be misinterpreted as brindling. Black–Blacks are all black. A black with brindle markings or a black with tan markings is a disqualification. Yellow–Yellows may range in color from fox-red to light cream, with variations in shading on the ears, back, and underparts of the dog. Chocolate–Chocolates can vary in shade from light to dark chocolate. Chocolate with brindle or tan markings is a disqualification.

These “dilute” dogs are being advertised as “rare”.  They’re no more rare than any mix-breed dog. There is a reason reputable breeders do not sell them — It is not a Labrador color. This is unlike brindle colored Labs and Black and tan happen, and are seldom produced (see my article), so do other unusual non-standard colors. This is different.  Any breeder who breeds more than a couple of litters will, in time, produce a mismark. There is nothing wrong with it, and they’re just sold as pets. Contrary to the claim on one silver site, nobody feels shame when they produce a mismark. However, “silver” isn’t just a “mismark”.. it’s something different. How different? Some say deliberately through mixed breeding when the breed was developed, some say deliberately created by recent mix breeding, and some say through a genetic fluke. “Silvers” started in a kennel of Labs and … shock of shocks… Weimaraners.   Regardless, You shouldn’t be asked to pay more for something that is incorrect and out of the Labrador Standard. “Silver” Labradors are not *ever* registered as “Silver”; They are registered as chocolates, and chocolates are NOT rare!

The AKC determined that silver Labradors are “dilute chocolates”. The term dilute has a genetic basis. The dilute locus is “d/d”. The Weimaraner is an example of a brown dog with a diluted coat color. The d/d locus is always “turned on” in Weim’s. There is no known d/d locus in *purebred* Labradors.

Of course, when the AKC made that determination, there were no DNA tests to prove color or parentage (although one website for “silver” claims the AKC did DNA testing back then — they did not. DNA was not available back then). The eval was done by photographs, observing living specimens and pedigrees. It was the best guess for the cause of the trait that they could give at the time.

Fast forward to today, when DNA can now show us things we could not see before. In an article posted in the Labrador Retriever Club News (LRC, Inc — the parent club), Francis O Smith DVM PhD states:

“It is the opinion of the LRC that a silver Labrador is not a purebred Labrador . The pet owning public is being duped into believing that these animals are desirable, purebred, and rare and therefore warrant special notoriety or a premium purchase price.”

As you can see on the vetgen site, the genetic markers for Labrador coloration is well established. Through DNA, color (including the colors the dog carries) can be absolutely proven. Where are the “rare” or “unusual” findings on the DNA color charts? They don’t exist. They are simply part and parcel of the three colors in Labradors. Black, yellow and chocolate. If a chocolate dog has the d/d genotype (as the AKC suggested silver Labradors have), it will have a “blue” or “gray” coat color. It is believed that some blue dogs are more prone to skin problems and perhaps allergies than dogs that are black.

Don’t be fooled by those who would promise to give money to those who can “prove” a silver is not a Labrador. That is not possible, unless said kennel DNA’d dogs before DNA was done, and we could DNA those past generations. A DNA test on a dog can only show that a canine is a canine, that mom is mom, and Dad is dad (and grandparents are the grandparents, if DNA was harvested from those dogs), and it can show the color traits (and other traits) it carries, as well as other traits that have been mapped. What it can’t tell you, is if a dog jumped the fence 10 years before DNA testing was done.  You may have heard that there are DNA tests that show what breed your dog is.  Every genetic expert will tell you these tests are false and results are shady at best.   What we do know, is that “Silver” breeders are DNA testing their dogs for coat color, and have indeed found that they are d/d (Dilute), which is a color trait that is only found in other breeds (see Weimaraners). One could not prove by DNA on a canine, that a dog several generations back was not a Labrador.

It is suspected that a non-Labrador jumped the fence a long time ago, and the result was the passing on of a d/d locus, but that again, is only a suspicion. I’ve been breeding chocolates to chocolates for a long time (since about 1988) and have never produced a “dilute” chocolate. I know other breeders who have been breeding chocolates for over 35 years, and have yet to produce it. Interestingly, the kennel who first started producing the color could only get it by inbreeding. That kennel did a *lot* of very close inbreeding. Nothing will set a trait like inbreeding will (of course it will produce negative traits as well). The color was then touted as a “rare” color, and others started breeding it.

If you’re interested, ask the silver breeders how many of their dogs are winning in the conformation ring. I can answer that for you — NONE. Why? Because it would be considered a disqualifiable fault. “Any other color or a combination of colors is a disqualification.” They can compete in Obedience and Field trials. They can not compete in conformation.

I am now aware that there are “breeders” here in California, who advertise on their websites black, yellow and chocolate puppies for sale, but offer “silver” Labradors for an elevated price when unsuspecting people come to see their puppies. They’re either too embarrassed to put on their website that they do, or too dishonest. Likely it’s because they know this aberration it is incorrect, can’t be registered as the color they tout, and because they know buyers are better informed than ever. There are other kennels who are very happy to tell you that they breed this “rare” color, and will be happy to have you pay for the honor of owning a dog that is no better than any other mismark in the breed.

Yes, at one time, these “dilute chocolates” were registered as “silver” using a convenient option found on old puppy registration papers. The options read; Black, Yellow, Chocolate, and OTHER. Under “other” there was a line that the person could fill in. The breeders of “rare silver Labradors” filled in silver as their color of choice and the dog was registered as a silver Labrador. Had they written “pink” on that line, they’d be the owner of a rare “Pink” Labrador. Just because a dog was once registered as silver, does not make the color correct, or valid. The AKC fixed the problem, and eliminated the “other” category.

You must beware of misleading “facts” when you read Web pages. For instance, this quote: “We feel it is just a matter of time before the AKC recognizes the Silver Lab color as it’s own separate color.” This shows how misinformed these “silver breeders” are. The AKC does not “own” the breed standards, nor do they write them. The breed parent clubs do!

……….Exhibits are judged against individual breed standards, which have been established for the AKC-recognized breeds by their parent clubs. These written standards describe the ideal size, color, and temperament of each breed, as well as correct proportion, structure, and movement.” [AKC quote source] .

Wouldn’t you like your breeder to actually know who writes and owns the breed standard?

[just one small note…there isn’t a single recognized registry world-wide, with a Labrador standard that recognizes “Silver” Labradors]

I have read the web sites of people trying to convince the world through poor arguments that silvers are a “real” coat color in Labs, and argue that they’ve always existed, but just like chocolates, they were never bred. This is a misleading statement. Yes, unusual colors have cropped up throughout the history of Labradors. That doesn’t mean the colors are correct. There are disqualifying colors and markings in all breeds. In order to maintain a standard, acceptable colors were defined, and written into the breed standards. One page that would have you pay top-dollar for one of these “rare” colors, says “….after breeders who could not produce Silver in their bloodlines began to protest, AKC changed the Silver color to ‘a shade of chocolate’.” Wrong. I was there. Reputable breeders of Labradors complained to the AKC that their “OTHER” option for color on AKC puppy registrations was opening the door for dogs (including silvers) who were out of standard to be defined as a “color” in Labradors, when in fact, it was an error in coloration, akin to a mismarked puppy. The AKC agreed. They studied the “silvers”, determined that they were a dilute chocolate, and began to require they be registered as chocolates. The “other” option was removed from puppy registrations.

The same page also states “Some of these ethical breeders freely admit killing Silver puppies to protect the breed standards. In reality, the Silver puppies they kill have the same genetic make-up as the blacks, yellows, and chocolates they allow to survive. The only ethic these breeders are protecting is the ethical investment they have in their black and yellow bloodlines.” Ask for names. They won’t have any. The reason they won’t have any names, is that no reputable breeder has had a “silver” puppy. Mismarked puppies occur all the time. They’re not euthanized, they’re sold as pets. This entire quote is intended to yank at your heart strings, and paint reputable breeders as heartless creatures.   I have been very involved in the Labrador community nation wide for almost 30 years, and know of NO reputable breeder today who has even produced a silver, let alone euthanize it. I belong to several web forums of Labrador breeders, and when asked what they would do if it were even possible for them to produce a silver (none of them had), what would they do with it? Answer — sell it just like any mismarked puppy, at a reduced price. I myself have produced mismarks (as all breeders eventually will if they stay in the sport long enough), and sell them at a reduced cost to pet homes, who are thrilled to have this dog, which is a Labrador through-and-through, however, mismarked. I would not euthanize a puppy because of color, and I know of no breeder, of the thousands of breeders I am involved with who would. Back when the breed was being established, sadly, “culling” (euthanizing) puppies of undesirable color was not an unknown practice. That was LONG ago, and long before safe spay and neuter practices, and limited registrations.

And how do you get a pedigree from at least one of these kennels? Well you pay money for the privilege of having an outsourced agency send you the pedigree. How much money? Far more than the current postage of three pieces of paper can justify. A reputable breeder is more than happy to share their pedigrees, and many post them on their websites for your immediate review.

Almost all of the silver Websites use the argument that silver is just new, “like chocolate is new”. No, chocolate is not new, it just wasn’t a preferred color for a long time, and not bred for. It was known, it was recognized, it just wasn’t preferred. One new page on “silvers” states “If you recall about 20 years ago, the chocolate Labs were the latest color in the lab world”.

FALSE! This is a statement intended to mislead and misinform the unknowing reader. Well over 20 years ago, there were chocolate champions!

One producer of “silver Labradors” wrote in an email on 2/26/05 the following “The first yellow lab was born in a litter in the 1890’s as a mutation from the dominate black color. The chocolate mutated from the yellow in the1900’s and finally the silver mutated from the chocolate.” They have their facts wrong regarding the appearance of chocolate. “Liver” (Chocolate) came before yellow. I wonder how chocolate mutated from the yellow, when the chocolates showed up first? Wouldn’t you want your breeder to know how the different colors are inherited?
Facts:
1892 – Two “liver” colored Labrador pups were born at Buccleuch’s kennel
1899 – First yellow Lab on record, Ben of Hyde born at kennel of Major C.J. Radclyffe

It makes one wonder what other details these “silver” breeders have wrong!

Buccleuch Avon was one of the founders of the modern Labrador, and he carried the

TweedCH Sandyland’s Tweed of Blaircourt (left) was a black, who carried yellow and chocolate, and sired chocolates who achieved their Championships in the ’60’s.

Chocolates are not new, not unusual, and were not unknown or even “new” in the Labrador world 20 years ago. They were quite established long before that, and their genetics well known.

So, what do the people who want to charge you more money for a non-recognized color do? Start their own silver “Registry”, of course. Pretty soon, they’ll have their own shows, and claim Championships received through these non-recognized registries. Before you purchase a registered puppy, it would do you well to establish if the registry is recognized by the dog fancy in general. Another way to determine how reputable a registry is, would be to find out how many dogs are registered annually.

The most recognized purebred dog registries in North America are AKC (American Kennel Club) CKC (Canadian Kennel Club).

The most recognized purebred dog registries in North America are AKC (American Kennel Club) CKC (Canadian Kennel Club).The American Kennel Club was established in 1884. The AKC sponsors over 15,000 dog competitions each year. Currently, the AKC recognizes 157 breeds of dogs.

The American Kennel Club was established in 1884. The AKC sponsors over 15,000 dog competitions each year. Currently, the AKC recognizes 157 breeds of dogs. The American Kennel Club registers over one million dogs annually. The Canadian Kennel Club was established in1888, and recognizes over 160 breeds of dogs. The CKC registers approximately 100,000 purebred dogs annually.

Don’t be fooled into purchasing a puppy from a registry that started in the 21st Century, and registers a dozen or so dogs annually!

As I said, there have been accusations that these “rare” silver Labradors are actually a cross between a Labrador and a Weimaraner. I will let you be the judge, as there is no evidence at this time, one way or the other. However, it is interesting to note that Silver Labradors can be traced back to two breeders. Those breeders are Dean Crist (Culo) and Beaver Creek Labradors. Both of their lines trace back to Kellogg kennels (L.E. Kellogg and Harold E. Kellogg) Kellogg Kennels began breeding Labradors in 1922.  Guess what else they’re famous for breeding?  They’re credited for the ‘rare’ pointing Labrador of course!

[I had included information in this article that the Kellogg kennel had Weims.  I have recently been told that’s in question.  I have deleted that statement, since I do not know if they did or did not. If I am able to find out if they did, I will include that information herein ]

First, you need to learn what the breed traits are (Weim vs. Lab). Please note comparisons to the standards of the breeds (breed standard excerpts below): long houndy ears, vs. short closely held ears. Note: houndy expression vs. lack of hound expression. Note, light eyes vs. dark eyes. Note double coat vs. single coat (a Lab has a downy undercoat, that can even be seen where hair is sparse, such as the head, giving it a fuller look vs. a very close/short look).

Here are a few highlighted portions of the American Kennel Club Standard for Labrador Retrievers:

  • The Labrador Retriever coat colors are black, yellow and chocolate. Any other color or a combination of colors is a disqualification.
  • Eye color should be brown in black and yellow Labradors, and brown or hazel in chocolates. Black, or yellow eyes give a harsh expression and are undesirable.
  • Ears should not be large and heavy, but in proportion with the skull and reach to the inside of the eye when pulled forward.

Disqualifications
1. Any deviation from the height prescribed in the Standard.
2. A thoroughly pink nose or one lacking in any pigment.
3. Eye rims without pigment.
4. Docking or otherwise altering the length or natural carriage of the tail.
5. Any other color or a combination of colors other than black, yellow or chocolate as described in the Standard.

Here are a few highlighted portions of the American Kennel Club Standard for the Weimaraner

  • Ears–Long and lobular, slightly folded and set high. The ear when drawn snugly alongside the jaw should end approximately 2 inches from the point of the nose.
  • Eyes–In shades of light amber, gray or blue-gray
  • Coat and Color – Short, smooth and sleek, solid color, in shades of mouse-gray to silver-gray, usually blending to lighter shades on the head and ears.

Now take a look at a few examples of “silver Labradors” from the Web, and make your own decisions:

dog1

dog 2

dog 3

I strongly suggest you be on the lookout for buzz words like “Rare” and “Unique”. Watch out for outrageous claims of how “superior” a breeder thinks they are. What reputable breeder needs to tell you how wonderful they are? The correctness of their dogs, speaks to the quality of any breeder. Watch out for claims of “show” careers. These “silver” dogs can only compete in the breed ring as chocolates, and the chocolate color is well described in the breed standard, so when you see reference to “shades of chocolate”, please refer to the breed standard for clarification. Also, you will note that some “silver” breeders show pictures of dogs that look distinctly chocolate, however, you will pay more for the privilege of calling your puppy “silver”.

One breeder of silvers states “Does it really matter what we choose to call them? ” Ummm… yes, since the AKC breed standard, and in fact every established standard around the world, goes to great length to describe the accepted colors.

And if in your Internet travels you see a description between “typical type” and “show type”. Lets get this straight… there is only ONE Labrador Retriever described in the standard (the written blueprint for the breed). If you find a description of anything more than *the* Labrador in the breed standard, please let me know! http://www.akc.org/breeds/labrador_retriever/index.cfm . The public often does talk about “English Labs” and “field labs” in order to define different “types” (which is a misnomer, since few of the dogs had seen England in many generations, and *all* Labradors should be able to work in the field). In my 25+ years of breeding, that’s how reputable breeders have referred to it as well, but in truth, there is only one Labrador Retriever, and one standard that defines them.

Also, please pay attention to any site that calls obviously CHOCOLATE Labradors “Silver”. This is an interesting twist. Hey, at least they really are an accepted color within the breed — chocolate!
On many silver sites, you will see the following “facts”:

“Breeders of black and yellow Labs saw their market share fall through the floor when chocolates became popular in the Lab marketplace.”

Truth: Breeders of blacks and yellows are happily thriving. Some breeders breed all three colors, some any combination of two. Some only black, some only yellow, and some only chocolate. The Labrador Retriever is has been the #1 registered dog in the AKC for many years, and there is no lack of homes for purebred Labradors. Nobody is seeing any “market share fall through the floor”.

“These same breeders opposed recognition of chocolates by AKC for decades.”
Write to these “accusers” and ask for names. They won’t have any.

COLOR STANDARDS AROUND THE WORLD:

The AKC standard for color:
The Labrador Retriever coat colors are black, yellow and chocolate. Any other color or a combination of colors is a disqualification. A small white spot on the chest is permissible, but not desirable. White hairs from aging or scarring are not to be misinterpreted as brindling. Black–Blacks are all black. A black with brindle markings or a black with tan markings is a disqualification. Yellow–Yellows may range in color from fox-red to light cream, with variations in shading on the ears, back, and underparts of the dog. Chocolate–Chocolates can vary in shade from light to dark chocolate. Chocolate with brindle or tan markings is a disqualification.

Here is what the AKC has to say about eye color: Eye color should be brown in black and yellow Labradors, and brown or hazel in chocolates. Black, or yellow eyes give a harsh expression and are undesirable
Ears–The ears should hang moderately close to the head, set rather far back, and somewhat low on the skull; slightly above eye level. Ears should not be large and heavy, but in proportion with the skull and reach to the inside of the eye when pulled forward.
Other standards around the world…………

FCI standard
The Labrador Retriever coat colors are black, yellow and chocolate. Any other color or a combination of colors is a disqualification. A small white spot on the chest is permissible, but not desirable. White hairs from aging or scarring are not to be misinterpreted as brindling.
UKC Standard:
Color may be solid black, any solid shade of yellow from red to pale cream, or any solid shade of chocolate. Yellow dogs may have variations in shading on the ears, back and underside of the dog. A small white spot on the chest is permissible but not preferred. White hairs from aging or scarring should not be penalized.
Disqualifications: Any color or combination of colors other than described above; albinism.
Where in any of these world-wide recognized standards do you see “silver” as an accepted color? You don’t.

If you have made it this far on the page, be sure to take notice of a problem that is prevalent in lines that produce  “Silver” and “Charcoal” Labradors.  It is called Color Dilution Alopecia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canine_follicular_dysplasia

Photo 1

Photo 2

There is a Facebook Page for owners of dogs with this problem:

https://www.facebook.com/ColorDilutionAlopecia

BUYER BEWARE!!
My next update may be to include the hate mail I receive from Silver breeders.  They’re an interesting group, who have mastered the art of using profanity as a second language!

These People Stole Our Kennel Name

These people stole my kennel name, and put an image of a mix-breed dogs on two or more of its pages, using my kennel name on the dogs!  The dogs do not reflect the quality of BLUE KNIGHT, and we have not, and never will breed “silver” dogs.  Labrador Retrievers come in three colors: Black, Chocolate, and Yellow.  NOT Silver, NOT Charcoal.  

Picture Lights Club, (https://picturelights.club/)

I have no idea who you are, or what you are, but you have photos of dogs called “Blue Knight Labrador Retriever”:
https://picturelights.club/galleries/blue-knight-labrador-retriever.html

Those dogs are in NO WAY Blue Knight Labrador Retrievers. *I* am Blue Knight Labradors, and that photo is a lie. That horrible representative of a Labrador belongs to Ellendale Labradors.

REMOVE “Blue Knight Labrador from your heading”.  You have stolen my kennel name for your image page.

One Crazy Whelping

A Facebook friend recounted a harrowing adventure in whelping a litter, and it caused me to recount one of mine.

My most/least (you pick) favorite whelping memory started fine. She went in to labor, and delivered one puppy without ceremony, …and then nothing! Secondary inertia seemed likely, as she did nothing for hours. Absolutely nothing. Dan and I drove off our hill in the middle of the night, headed for the E-Vet, with me in the back with my bitch, sure we were headed for a c-section. Half way to the vet, she decided the time was right to start pushing. We pulled the car over, and a nice healthy puppy was born. We turned the car around, and started for home. She started pushing again. As she did, a car zipped past us in the fast lane, zig-zagged into the slow lane ahead of us, lost control and rolled over the embankment. The resulting dust looked like an explosion!

As all of that was was happening, I failed to see it, because I was assisting the puppy from the birth canal.. but of course, I felt the braking, heard the gasps and swearing from Dan. I had that puppy with its placenta still in hand, and I looked up and saw the billow of dirt to our right, as Dan pulled our car over. I now had two wet puppies, one still in my hand, one in my lap in a towel, and one older sibling in the warming box, and my bitch starts pushing yet again. Now, I was an ER Nurse, and should have immediately leaped from the car to rescue the driver, but that accident looked like it had to be a fatal crash, and I had lives counting on me where I was. I yelled at Dan to go see just how wounded the driver was, because if he/she was already dead, I wasn’t leaving my dog! He could do CPR as well as me if necessary. If anyone was alive, I would assist.

Just as I said that (as I was trying to cut the cord on that puppy before the next appeared), a woman runs up the embankment and runs almost into our car. Dan and I both yelled “how many in the car, and do you need an ambulance?” She screamed “just me, don’t call the police” and starts running down the freeway in the center of the slow lane on foot, drunk as can be. We called 911, and a CHP Officer nearly materialized before our eyes. I yelled for Dan to call my neighbor to come get me and leave her car for Dan because he had to give a witness account. I told him “You witnessed this, I didn’t!!! I need to get out of here!” Dan called Leslee. I helped deliver puppy number 4. Momma relaxed. More were coming, but she clearly needed a break from her jet propelled prior three.

Think this story is crazy enough? As Dan is talking to the CHP, who had run after the woman and returned with her, my neighbor’s truck almost screamed past us. She pulled over in a cloud of dust just a ways ahead of us. I swear she opened her door and piled out before the dust settled, and ran toward us in her nightgown, robe, and slippers. She runs almost headlong into the Deputy screaming “WE’RE HAVING PUPPIES!!!” She tossed her keys at Dan, and without so much as an adios, jumps in my car, and drives us home, leaving Dan, her truck, the very confused looking officer and the drunk behind.

Hi-Yo, Silver! Away……..

—-

We lost Leslee some years later to cancer. Gosh I miss her, but remembering this story gave me a great laugh and a wonderful memory of her.

Puppy Buyers Beware

Are you buying a new puppy?  There’s a sucker born every minute. Don’t be one!
Here is a list of some of the best examples of someone trying to set the hook that I have found on the Web.
Hint: If someone is telling you they have any sort of “rare” Labrador, you’re being had. There is no such thing.
“Breeder of the rare fox red Labrador Retriever dogs”
Fox Red is the description of the darkest yellow coloration in yellow Labradors. Fox red occurs normally, and is not rare at all.
“Labradors in striking shades of Charcoal Gray, Chocolate and Silver. America’s Favorite Dog in a rare and beautiful color”
The AKC Standard calls for BLACK, YELLOW AND CHOCOLATE.
Charcoal Silver and gray?  Read the standard.
Chocolate is rare? I think not!
 ” Playful puppies, Rare chocolates..”
There is nothing rare about chocolate!
 “..rare white Labradors”
The AKC Standard calls for BLACK, YELLOW AND CHOCOLATE.
“white” might be a very light cream colored yellow (not rare at all), or worse, an albino. Albinism refers to a group of genetic defects that cause decreased levels of the pigment, melanin. The eyes might also be affected and have an iris that is pink, dull-gray to blue. Their skin is a very pale pink, and if their eyes are pink, this is called tyrosinase-negative. Dogs with Albinism *are* very rare (thank heavens), and are likely to be deaf , and have sensitive skin.  Most likely, the “rare white” labrador being advertised is simply a very light yellow. There is nothing rare or special about them.
 “….information on America’s Favorite Dog in a rare and beautiful color”
“Rare” AND “beautiful”…the perfect package for some unlucky person!
 “…specializing in the rare Labradoodles”
A cross between Labs and poodles! I sure hope this is rarely done.

“…rare white, Gray and silver Labradors”
Once again… not rare, just wrong!

” White Labradors. Since they are still somewhat rare, they do cost a little more, but they are really neat dogs.”
Are you starting to see a pattern? You’re going to pay more for a normal/common light cream colored yellow, or worse, for an albino( you pay more for the mistakes of nature– yes, albinism is extremely rare.)
“Specializing in rare silvers (gray)”.
rare = wrong
“…rare AKC registered  chocolate, silver, and black labradors”
Nope, Labs with silver coloration (dilute chocolate) are registered as chocolate. You’ll never find a Lab registered as silver. Again, this person lists normal colors as “rare”… chocolates are not rare, and black is the dominant color — hardly RARE.
“White Labradors … They do exist, very rare… ”
There sure are a lot of these “RARE” whites, doncha think?”Breeding cream,
black, rare fox red, bred for beauty, intelligence and great temperament”
Cream is just a light shade of YELLOW. Humm… here we are again…fox reds are NOT rare!”Labradors in exceedingly rare colors…”
Wow.. exceedingly rare! This must be for the exceedingly naive sucker.
“…rare miniature Labradors”
Oh goodie. A labrador for apartment dwellers! There is no such thing as a miniature Lab. There are dwarf labradors. Health risks that come with dwarfism includes crippling joint disease and blindness.

You get the picture! If a breeder is advertising a color other than that found in the Breed Standard, or other than known mismarks in the breed (article on this page), you’re being had.

 

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Website Built by Blue Knight. All graphics , photographs, and original articles are the property of Blue Knight.  Permission must be obtained for use on other sites or for other purposes.